Menu

Pest Control Identification for Pantry Pests-Indian Meal Moths, Grain Beetles, Flour Beetles, Grain Weevil, Larder Beetles

identification prior to rendering any pantry pest treatment. Identifying your Pantry Pests will result in properly executed treatment, with little to no future ongoing pest activity. As with most pantry pest the best way to resolve your pantry pest problem is finding the source and throwing the infected product away. Below are examples of many Pantry Pests that are available throughout the area. Pantry Pests are a very select group of insects and require a specialized treatment process. Please consult with a professional pest control company prior to making your own treatment.
 Confused Flour BeetleConfused Flour Beetle Tribolium Confusum known as “bran bugs,” primarily attack milled grain products, such as flour and cereals, and are flat, elongated, shiny, reddish-brown measuring about 1/8″ long. Adults and larvae feed on grain dust and broken kernels, but not the undamaged whole grain kernels and often hitchhike into the home in infested flour and can multiply into large populations when untreated. Confused flour beetles have a straight-sided thorax, while the thorax of the red flour beetle has curved sides. Brown-headed larvae are cream to yellow, slender, and wiry, reaching a length of 1/4?. Larvae have six legs and two-pointed or forked projections at the last rear body segment and pupae are white to light brown.
Drugstore BeetleDrugstore Beetle Stegobium Paniceum is 1/16-1/8″ long, reddish brown to brown and commonly infest cereals, cornmeal, cornstarch, popcorn, rice, dried fruits, breakfast foods, flour, rolled oats, bran, macaroni, sugar, drugs, spices, herbs, candy, dried meats, chocolate, bread, nuts, crackers, raisins, dried dog and cat food, and other foodstuffs, making them un-sellable and unpalatable. The female drugstore beetle lays her eggs in and near stored goods and foodstuffs. The eggs hatch in a few days, then go through 4-6 stages during the next 4-5 months. The full-grown larva pupates for about 12-18 days in a silk cocoon with some particles of food woven into it. The complete life cycle usually takes about 7 months.
Grain BeetleGrain Beetle Oryzaephilus Surinamensis are flattened, reddish-brown, and about 1/10″ long, and commonly infest cereals, cornmeal, cornstarch, popcorn, rice, dried fruits, breakfast foods, flour, rolled oats, bran, macaroni, sugar, drugs, spices, herbs, candy, dried meats, chocolate, bread, nuts, crackers, raisins, dried dog and cat food, and other foodstuffs, making them un-sellable and unpalatable. These beetles are capable of chewing into unopened paper or cardboard boxes, through cellophane, plastic, and foil wrapped packages. Once inside, populations build up rapidly often spreading to other stored foods and into food debris accumulated in the cupboard corners, cracks, and crevices.
Grain WeevilGrain Weevil or Granary Weevil Sitophilus Granarius is about 1/10″ long and commonly infest cereals, cornmeal, cornstarch, popcorn, rice, dried fruits, breakfast foods, flour, rolled oats, bran, macaroni, sugar, drugs, spices, herbs, candy, dried meats, chocolate, bread, nuts, crackers, raisins, dried dog and cat food, and other foodstuffs. The female bores a hole in an individual cereal grain and implants an egg in it. The egg hatches and a  fleshy white larva feeds on the grain product and then pupates.
Indian Meal MothIndian Meal Moths Plodia Interpunctella is 5/8-3/4″ long, with pale gray wings, with the front of the wing reddish brown and coppery on the outer two-thirds. Adults cause no damage, but larvae produce the web material found in food, such as dried fruits, whole wheat and graham flours, cornmeal, and shelled or ear corn. Indian meal moths commonly infest grain products; lots of different dried foods, such as fruit, nuts, seeds, crackers, and powdered milk; chocolate, candy; dried red peppers; dry dog food; bird seed. The Indian meal moth female lays 100-400 eggs, singly or in small groups, on food material during a 1-18 day period of time. The newly hatched larva establishes itself in a crevice of food material, making a webbed tunnel-like case of frass and silk, in which, or near which, it feeds. The last instar larva leaves the food to find a suitable place for pupation. The complete life cycle takes 25-135 days, with 4-6 generations per year.
Larder BeetleLarder Beetle Dermestes Lardariusis slightly longer than 1/4″ long, roundly oval, dark brown to black with a characteristics of light colored band running across the body, and is a very common widespread household insect pest. The insect’s name comes from it’s presence in dried, cured meats stored at room temperature prior to refrigeration, and may be found in stored foods and other items of high protein content. Larder beetles larvae and adults feed on items such as fur, hair, hides, feathers, and occasionally stored products such as dried fish, pet food and cheese.  In the house, however, the most likely source is dead insects or other animals (Boxelder bugs, attic flies, mice, etc.) that have accumulated inside walls or attics.
Contact TheLens for your next Pantry Pest quote today!
(702) 582-5367